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Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law

posted onOctober 15, 2017
by l33tdawg

The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law.

Inside Uber’s $100,000 Payment to a Hacker, and the Fallout

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

“Hello Joe,” read the November 2016 email from someone identifying himself as “John Doughs.” “I have found a major vulnerability in Uber.”

The email appeared to be no different from other messages that Joe Sullivan, Uber’s chief security officer, and his team routinely received through the company’s “bug bounty” program, which pays hackers for reporting holes in the ride-hailing service’s systems, according to current and former Uber security employees.

Russian hackers are targeting U.S. Senate email accounts

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

According to a new report, the same group that hacked the Democratic National Committee actively targeted the U.S. Senate through the latter half of 2017. The revelation comes out of a new report from Trend Micro, a Japanese firm that has revealed similar phishing schemes taking aim at foreign governments in the past. As the security report details, the activity began in June 2017 and attempted to compromise a lawmaker’s credentials through a phishing site designed to look like the Senate’s internal email system.

NASA-Funded Research Will Let Unmanned Spacecraft “Think” Using AI and Blockchain

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

As mankind expands outwards into the universe, unmanned spacecraft will face a growing problem: as Earth becomes more distant, the transmission time for information and instructions to reach these craft becomes longer and longer. This time lag could make it difficult or even impossible for satellites to respond to fast-moving threats, like space debris, or quickly take opportunities to collect data from unexpected sources, like a passing meteorite.

You may be making cryptocurrency for hackers without realising

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

Adblockers are trying to prevent people from accidentally helping criminals mine cryptocurrencies like bitcoin. Malicious code running in the background of thousands of webpages can hijack a visitor’s computing power to generate cryptocurrency in a process called cryptojacking. There is no sure-fire way to avoid cryptojacking, but blacklists managed by adblockers should keep you away from the worst culprits.

How Hawaii Could Have Sent a False Nuclear Alarm

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

As the citizens of Hawaii came out of hiding in their bathtubs and basements Saturday morning, after learning that the emergency alert they had received, warning of an imminent nuclear missile attack, was a false alarm, their fear and panic transformed into rage.

"I'm extremely angry right now. People should lose their jobs if this was an error," Hawaii State Representative Matt Lopresti told CNN.

Google Pulls 60 Malicious Apps With Millions of Downloads from Play Store

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

The fallout of the widespread Meltdown and Spectre processor vulnerabilities continued this week. WIRED took an in-depth look at the parallel sagas that caused four research teams to independently discover the bugs within months of each other. Dozens of patches are now floating around to try to defend devices against attacks that might exploit the vulnerabilities, but a significant amount of time and resources has gone into vetting and installing the patches, because they slow processors down and generally take a toll on systems in some situations.

Netflix, Amazon, and major studios sue maker of “free TV” box

posted onJanuary 15, 2018
by l33tdawg

Netflix, Amazon, and the major film studios have sued the makers of "The Dragon Box," a device that connects to TVs and lets users watch video without a cable TV or streaming service subscription.

Joining Netflix and Amazon as plaintiffs in the suit are Columbia Pictures, Disney, Paramount Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox, Universal, and Warner Bros. The suit asks for financial damages and an injunction preventing Dragon Media from continuing the alleged copyright infringement.