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Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law

posted onOctober 15, 2017
by l33tdawg

The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law.

Cambridge Analytica Could Also Access Private Facebook Messages

posted onApril 11, 2018
by l33tdawg

The data consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, which harvested as many as 87 million Facebook users' personal data, also could have accessed the private inbox messages of some of those affected. Facebook slipped this previously undisclosed detail into the notifications that began appearing at the top of News Feeds on Monday. These alerts let users know whether they or their friends had downloaded a personality quiz app called This Is Your Digital Life, which would have caused their data to be collected and potentially passed on to Cambridge Analytica.

Steam Spy announces it’s shutting down, blames Valve’s new privacy settings

posted onApril 11, 2018
by l33tdawg

In light of Internet and social-media privacy landing at the top of major news outlets this week, another major online service announced its own privacy-policy updates on Tuesday. The latest change comes from Steam, the Western world's largest online PC game seller. According to Steam's creators at Valve, an updated settings panel will soon let gamers more clearly decide how their use of the service is communicated to approved friends and the public at large.

Facebook CEO puts on suit and a smile to try to seduce, assuage senators

posted onApril 11, 2018
by l33tdawg

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled before the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees in a Tuesday hearing that lasted hours.

Zuckerberg reiterated numerous times in both written and spoken testimony that, yes, the company made mistakes when dealing with Cambridge Analytica, the now-maligned British data analytics firm that worked with the Donald Trump presidential campaign. He also underscored the numerous new policies that Facebook has been rolling out in recent days, ranging from ad monitoring to more Burmese language support, among other changes.

Oregon finalizes net neutrality law despite likelihood that ISPs will sue

posted onApril 10, 2018
by l33tdawg

Oregon Governor Kate Brown today will sign a net neutrality bill into law, making Oregon the second state to pass a net neutrality law since the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal nationwide rules.

Brown announced on Friday that she would sign the bill Monday during an event at a middle school. The bill was previously approved by the state House and Senate.

17% of Workers Fall for Social Engineering Attacks

posted onApril 10, 2018
by l33tdawg

In tests that imitated the actions of hackers by sending emails to employees with links to websites, password entry forms and attachments, 17% of the messages would have led to a compromise of the employee's workstation and, ultimately, the entire corporate infrastructure if they had been real.

Air gapping voting machines isn't enough, says one election security expert

The safeguards that election officials say protect voting machines from being hacked are not as effective as advertised, a leading election security expert says.

U.S. elections, including national ones, are run by state and local offices. While that decentralization could serve an argument that elections are difficult to hack, University of Michigan Professor J. Alex Halderman says that it’s more like a double-edged sword.

l33tdawg Tue, 04/10/2018 - 04:41 Industry News Security

China has started ranking citizens with a creepy ‘social credit’ system

posted onApril 9, 2018
by l33tdawg

 The Chinese state is setting up a vast ranking system system that will monitor the behaviour of its enormous population, and rank them all based on their “social credit.”

The “social credit system,” first announced in 2014, aims to reinforce the idea that “keeping trust is glorious and breaking trust is disgraceful,” according to a government document.