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Science

How to increase (or decrease) brain activity and memory

posted onNovember 17, 2014
by l33tdawg

Is it possible to rapidly increase (or decrease) the amount of information the brain can store?

A new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) suggests is may be. Their research has identified a molecule that improves brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports, the study has implications for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectral disorders and Alzheimer’s disease.

Making the long trip to Mars? Let NASA put you in a deep sleep

posted onOctober 7, 2014
by l33tdawg

 As many Doctors from the BBC science fiction series "Doctor Who" have so eloquently put it, humanity has an inherent desire to look up toward the sky with dreams of exploring to the ends of the universe. And while our space programs are in many ways in their infancy when it comes to intergalactic exploration, NASA scientists are looking at ways to send manned aircraft farther than we've ever gone before: to Mars.

Judgment and decision-making: Brain activity indicates there is more than meets the eye

posted onOctober 3, 2014
by l33tdawg

People make immediate judgments about images they are shown, which could impact on their decisions, even before their brains have had time to consciously process the information, a study of brainwaves led by The University Of Melbourne has found.

Published in PLOS ONE, the study is the first in the world to show that it is possible to predict abstract judgments from brain waves, even though people were not conscious of making such judgments. The study also increases our understanding of impulsive behaviors and how to regulate it.

India becomes the first Asian country to reach Mars

posted onSeptember 24, 2014
by l33tdawg

Mars has become the destination of choice for ambitious space agencies and nations, and now India is among that group. After a successful maneuver, the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) has entered an orbit about 420 km above the surface of Mars (MOM is informally called Mangalyaan, which is Hindi for Mars vehicle). It will soon begin to photograph the planet’s surface and analyze the atmospheric composition.

Hackathon aims to invent breast pumps that don't suck

posted onSeptember 24, 2014
by l33tdawg

JENNY BOURBEAU is frustrated. For the last 10 months, the Massachusetts mother has been expressing breast milk for her young son. Like many mothers, she needed to use a pump but found the experience impersonal and difficult.

"I spent a lot of time with the pump and the process, thinking about how much it sucks and how it could be better and wondering why it isn't yet," she says.

Massive survey makes sense of the diversity of quasars

posted onSeptember 22, 2014
by l33tdawg

In the hearts of some massive galaxies lie strange objects known as quasars. These mysterious objects were named for their apparent similarity to stars (quasar is short for ‘quasi-stellar radio source’), but they're now understood to be the light from rapidly accreting, supermassive black holes. In addition to their prodigious light output, they often emit jets of charged particles from their poles at close to the speed of light.

New technique gets pure hydrogen out of splitting water

posted onSeptember 22, 2014
by l33tdawg

Continued concerns about global warming have boosted work on alternative fuel sources that reduce emissions. Hydrogen is an appealing, clean-burning fuel. Currently, most hydrogen comes from the processing of fossil fuels, which produces carbon dioxide as a byproduct. However, the electrolysis of water produces hydrogen without the release of greenhouse gases—provided the electricity used in the process comes from renewable energy.

Now you can work in your sleep

posted onSeptember 16, 2014
by l33tdawg

Parts of your brain continue to function when you’re sleeping, researchers at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris and the University of Cambridge have discovered.

They recorded the EEG (brain waves) of human participants while they were awake after they were instructed to classify spoken words as either animals or objects by pressing a button, using the right hand for animals and the left hand for objects.

A closer look at the space shuttle that never got to space

posted onSeptember 16, 2014
by l33tdawg

The space shuttle Enterprise has been ensconced aboard the USS Intrepid for just over two years. It sits in a silent warehouse, dramatically lit so it appears to be cruising in a dark vacuum. Tourists can wander around or under it at the exhibit; they can even walk up some stairs and get nose-to-nose with the Enterprise, staring down its long axis through a thick layer of glass. While the whole thing evokes space exploration, the Enterprise has never actually made it out of Earth's atmosphere.