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Privacy

RSA Conference has a leaky app… again!

posted onApril 20, 2018
by l33tdawg

You wouldn’t expect the organisers of a seminar on nuclear physics to hand out conference badges that were contaminated with dangerous levels of radioactivity.

You wouldn’t expect to attend a workplace health and safety training course in a conference centre where the fire exits had been padlocked shut.

How to Check if Cambridge Analytica Could Access Your Facebook Data

posted onApril 10, 2018
by l33tdawg

In 2014, a researcher named Alexander Kogan created a personality quiz that 270,000 Facebook users would go on to install. From those downloads alone, he was able to harvest the personal information of up to 87 million people, according to Facebook's most recent estimate. He then passed that data along to Trump-affiliated political firm Cambridge Analytica, which would use it to target voters in the 2016 presidential election. Now Facebook has finally released a tool that lets you know whether you were affected.

China has started ranking citizens with a creepy ‘social credit’ system

posted onApril 9, 2018
by l33tdawg

 The Chinese state is setting up a vast ranking system system that will monitor the behaviour of its enormous population, and rank them all based on their “social credit.”

The “social credit system,” first announced in 2014, aims to reinforce the idea that “keeping trust is glorious and breaking trust is disgraceful,” according to a government document.

How to keep your ISP’s nose out of your browser history with encrypted DNS

posted onApril 9, 2018
by l33tdawg

The death of network neutrality and the loosening of regulations on how Internet providers handle customers' network traffic have raised many concerns over privacy. Internet providers (and others watching traffic as it passes over the Internet) have long had a tool that allows them to monitor individuals' Internet habits with ease: their Domain Name System (DNS) servers. And if they haven't been cashing in on that data already (or using it to change how you see the Internet), they likely soon will.

​VPNs can still be used in China despite March 31 ban

posted onApril 6, 2018
by l33tdawg

China's VPN ban came into effect on March 31, 2018, but virtual private network providers are still claiming their users have access to their services in the country.

China cracked down on the use of "unauthorised" VPNs throughout the course of 2017 with a campaign to take down and control censorship-thwarting software that attempts to break the country's surveillance and blocking lists.

Facebook Exposed 87 Million Users to Cambridge Analytica

posted onApril 6, 2018
by l33tdawg

Facebook now says the data firm Cambridge Analytica gained unauthorized access to up to 87 million users' data, mainly in the United States. This figure is far higher than the 50 million users that were previously reported.

Facebook's chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer shared this figure at the end of a lengthy—and somewhat unrelated—blog post Wednesday that laid out a slew of changes Facebook is making to restrict access to user data.

The FTC Is Officially Investigating Facebook's Data Practices

posted onMarch 27, 2018
by l33tdawg

The Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection confirmed Monday that has undertaken a non-public investigation into Facebook’s data practices, according to a statement from Tom Pahl, the agency’s acting director. The announcement comes just over a week after The New York Times and the The Guardian published explosive reports about the reported improper use of data belonging to 50 million Facebook users by the Trump-campaign affiliated data firm Cambridge Analytica.

How to Turn Off Facebook's Face Recognition Features

posted onFebruary 28, 2018
by l33tdawg

In recent days, more and more Facebook users started seeing a notification about how the social network uses its facial recognition technology. When Facebook first implemented the tech in 2013, it limited its use to suggesting tags in photos. In December, though, the company announced that it would expand face recognition's scope to notify you when someone added a photo you were in, whether it was tagged or not. If that sounds like something you'd rather Facebook not do, it's easy enough to stop.

Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscious

posted onFebruary 26, 2018
by l33tdawg

Google Chrome is one of the most popular web browsers in use today. People like it because it is quick and highly customizable. However, many people are leery of using it because Chrome tends to send lots of user information home to the massive Google servers. (You didn’t think that Google built these huge data centers to store cat videos, did you?) Thankfully, there is an alternative for those who are privacy conscious.