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HITB2013KUL

Vietnamese and Indonesian hackers claim top spots in #HITB2013KUL CTF contest

posted onOctober 23, 2013
by l33tdawg

Indonesian hackers were crowned third-placed winners in "Capture The Flag" contest held last week in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The international hacking competition involved 10 teams from seven countries is an annual event hosted by Hack In The Box (HITB), reported news portal DetikINET. Team Vietnam lifted the trophies for first and second positions in the show which also saw participants from Japan, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Singapore, South Korean, and Malaysia.

Facebook data mining tool uncovers your life

posted onOctober 22, 2013
by l33tdawg

You know you shouldn't post potentially damaging data on Facebook, but more often that not, your friends don't think twice about it, and this can impact you even more than you think. At the Hack In The Box conference in Kuala Lumpur, security consultants Keith Lee and Jonathan Werrett from SpiderLabs revealed how a simple tool can enable anyone to find a comprehensive amount of data on any user.

Hackers: Here's video of how Apple's iMessage surveillance flaw works

posted onOctober 18, 2013
by l33tdawg

Hackers this week showed security conference attendees findings and demonstrations directly contradicting Apple's public claim that it can't read iMessages.

Even though the messages are encrypted end-to-end as Apple claims, according to QuarksLab researchers showed a packed room at Hack In The Box Kuala Lumpur, due to the lack of certificate pinning, "Apple can technically read your iMessages whenever they want."

Experts: Yes, Apple and the NSA Can Read Your iMessages

posted onOctober 18, 2013
by l33tdawg

Security experts have long suspected that iMessage is not as safe and impenetrable as Apple claims. But a group of researchers says it has proof that Apple can indeed eavesdrop on your iMessages — and the NSA can, too.

The researchers, through a careful and thorough study of the iMessage protocol, conclude that Apple has the ability to intercept and decrypt iMessages. Even though the messages are encrypted end-to-end, Apple manages the keys needed to encrypt and exchange the messages, the researchers found.

Apple denies iMessage vulnerability after security firm publishes flaw

posted onOctober 18, 2013
by l33tdawg

Touting its commitment to user privacy in the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal earlier this year, Apple said that the end-to-end encryption protecting its iMessage instant-messenger service is so secure that even the company itself cannot decrypt it. But, on Thursday, security outfit QuarksLab disputed that claim, arguing that Apple could intercept iMessage communications if it wanted to.