The Last HITB Security Conference in Malaysia

Hands-on Technical Trainings - 13th & 14th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/#tile_schedule

Triple-Track Conference - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/conference-speakers/

 

Capture the Flag - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/capture-the-flag/

HackWEEKDAY - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/hackweekday/

CommSec Village - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/commsec-village/

REGISTER ONLINE NOW

Snowden's tools for hacking NSA not exactly high tech

http://static5.businessinsider.com/image/51b4ccf469bedd8715000000-1818-1363-390-/edward-snowden.png

Love him or loathe him, Edward Snowden has made a huge impact on the country, and the world, with the revelations that were leaked out about the National Security Agency and its tendency to spy on citizens both home and abroad.

To make that kind of impact, and to gain access to the documents in question, there must have been some pretty high level hacking going. Like, it must have been hard work, right?

Um... turns out, maybe not so much. In fact, the technology that Snowden used was both inexpensive, and commonly used, according to a report out from the New York Times this weekend. Snowden used software that is known as a “web crawler," which is designed to search, index and back up a website. It even allowed him to do his job at the same time, while the 1.7 million documents were being hacked.