LATE REGISTRATION RATES FOR #HITB2014KUL STARTS ON THE 1ST OF OCTOBER ONWARDS!

REGISTER ONLINE NOW

 

Hands-on Technical Trainings - 13th & 14th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/#tile_schedule

Triple-Track Conference - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/conference-speakers/

 

Capture the Flag - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/capture-the-flag/

HackWEEKDAY - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/hackweekday/

CommSec Village - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/commsec-village/

eHarmony confirms its members' passwords were posted online, too

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EHarmony

Online dating site eHarmony has confirmed that a massive list of passwords posted online included those used by its members.

"After investigating reports of compromised passwords, we have found that a small fraction of our user base has been affected," company officials said in a blog post published Wednesday evening. The company didn't say what percentage of 1.5 million of the passwords, some appearing as MD5 cryptographic hashes and others converted into plaintext, belonged to its members. The confirmation followed a report first brought by Ars that a dump of eHarmony user data preceded a separate dump of LinkedIn passwords.

eHarmony's blog also omitted any discussion of how the passwords were leaked. That's unsettling, because it means there's no way to know if the lapse that exposed member passwords has been fixed. Instead, the post repeated mostly meaningless assurances about the website's use of "robust security measures, including password hashing and data encryption, to protect our members’ personal information." Oh, company engineers also protect users with "state-of-the-art firewalls, load balancers, SSL and other sophisticated security approaches."