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Software-Programming

Mozilla Patches Firefox 26 With 14 Security Advisories

posted onDecember 11, 2013
by l33tdawg

Mozilla is out today with its latest milestone Firefox release, this time providing security fixes as well as new functionality in the open-source Web browser.

The Firefox 26 release first entered beta in early November. From a security feature perspective, the big change that Firefox 26 introduces is the concept of "click-to-play" plug-ins. Prior to Firefox 26, plug-ins such as Java would just load inside the browser whenever required by a given Website, and without the need for any specific user interaction.

CyanogenMod Installer Application Removed from Play Store

posted onNovember 28, 2013
by l33tdawg

Today, we were contacted by the Google Play Support team to say that our CyanogenMod Installer application is in violation of Google Play’s developer terms.

They advised us to voluntarily remove the application, or they would be forced to remove it administratively. We have complied with their wishes while we wait for a more favorable resolution.

U.S. Government Caught Pirating Military Software, Settles For $50 Million

posted onNovember 28, 2013
by l33tdawg

For years the U.S. military operated pirated copies of logistics software that was used to protect soldiers and shipments in critical missions. Apptricity, the makers of the software, accused the military of willful copyright infringement and sued the Government for nearly a quarter of a billion dollars in unpaid licenses.

In a settlement just announced, the Obama administration has agreed to pay $50 million to settle the dispute. In recent years the U.S. Government has taken an aggressive stance towards copyright infringement, both at home and abroad.

Half an operating system: The triumph and tragedy of OS/2

posted onNovember 26, 2013
by l33tdawg

It was a cloudy Seattle day in late 1980, and Bill Gates, the young chairman of a tiny company called Microsoft, had an appointment with IBM that would shape the destiny of the industry for decades to come.

He went into a room full of IBM lawyers, all dressed in immaculately tailored suits. Bill’s suit was rumpled and ill-fitting, but it didn’t matter. He wasn’t here to win a fashion competition.

Google hosts 'code-in' to get teens contributing to open-source projects

posted onNovember 20, 2013
by l33tdawg

Contributing to free/open-source software is one of the best ways to learn how to be a better hacker, both technically and ethically.

Most devs end up using a huge amount of open-source code in their projects, so giving back to these projects only makes sense. That’s the main idea behind the Google Code-in, a contest for teens to jump-start their participation in open-source software.

Docker: An open source startup you need to know about

posted onNovember 20, 2013
by l33tdawg

I love startup companies. I love open source software. I love innovation. Put them all together and you have the ingredients for something incredible. Meet Docker, Inc. (formerly known as dotCloud), the San Francisco based open source company that will revolutionize the way you package and deploy applications on Linux servers.

Through the persistence of Olivia Irvin of MindShare PR, I had the pleasure of meeting Ben Golub, CEO of Docker, Inc. I'm glad that she stayed in contact with me so that I would take notice of Docker, the solution and the company. It was a great find.

Booting to Rust

posted onNovember 20, 2013
by l33tdawg

A couple nights ago I was looking over the UEFI spec, and I realized it shouldn’t be too hard to write UEFI applications in Rust. It turns out, you can, and here I will tell you how.

Apple II DOS source code released

posted onNovember 13, 2013
by l33tdawg

Unlike the Apple I, the Apple II was fully assembled and ready to use with any display monitor. The version with 4K of memory cost $1298. It had color, graphics, sound, expansion slots, game paddles, and a built-in BASIC programming language.

What it didn’t have was a disk drive. Programs and data had to be saved and loaded from cassette tape recorders, which were slow and unreliable. The problem was that disks – even floppy disks – needed both expensive hardware controllers and complex software.

Chrome 32 lets you easily find and close those noisy tabs

posted onNovember 12, 2013
by l33tdawg

If you've ever wondered which of your 200 browser tabs is making all that racket, the latest Chrome Beta can lend an ear.

When a tab is streaming audio in Chrome 32 Beta, an indicator will appear next to the close tab X. The indicators will change depending on the source, so streaming audio will be denoted by a speaker icon, a red circle will indicate a Web cam, and Chromecast's box icon will notify you when you're broadcasting a tab to your television.