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2017 Was a Terrible Year for Internet Freedom

posted onJanuary 1, 2018
by l33tdawg

Think of a country that stifles internet freedom. You might first jump to the oppressive regimes of North Korea, China, or Cuba, where internet access is either forbidden or radically restricted. But in fact, according to a recent study by the non-profit Freedom House, the principles of internet freedom are under attack worldwide—including in the United States. And it's only getting worse.

Failed satellite programmed with 'wrong co-ordinates'

posted onDecember 29, 2017
by l33tdawg

The loss of a multi-million pound weather mapping satellite was due to programming errors, the Russian deputy prime minister has said.

Dmitry Rogozin said Meteor-M had been programmed for take-off from a different space station.

Speaking to Russian state TV, he blamed "human error". "The rocket was programmed as if it was taking off from Baikonur," he told the Rossyia 24 TV channel. In fact the rocket was actually taking off from new base Vostochny, in the east of the country.

Source code for Apple’s historic Lisa OS to be made available in 2018

posted onDecember 29, 2017
by l33tdawg

If you've ever been curious to test out Apple's original Lisa operating system, you'll get the chance to do so next year using the original source code. Al Kossow, a software curator for the Computer History Museum, announced that the source code for Apple's first operating system with a graphical user interface has been recovered and is currently with Apple for review. After the tech giant reviews it, the Computer History Museum will make the source code available to all sometime in 2018.

Apple’s response to battery controversy: have a new one for $29

posted onDecember 29, 2017
by l33tdawg

The past few weeks have been tumultuous for Apple ever since the company confirmed it slows down iPhones as their batteries age. In a message posted to Apple's website today, the company formally apologized to customers while explaining how iPhone batteries age, what Apple has already done to prevent unexpected device shutdowns, and what the company will do to address customer concerns.

A Growing and Evolving Cyber Threat

posted onDecember 28, 2017
by l33tdawg

By: Adam Edmond

As new technologies are developed, the DOD(Department of Defense) must continually re-evaluate the opportunities and threats these technologies create and adjust its strategy accordingly. Current trends in the development and democratization of digital technology call for such re-evaluation.

Watch a developer erase his face with the iPhone X

posted onDecember 28, 2017
by l33tdawg

The iPhone X's Face ID sensors have shown great potential for art, gaming and just weird apps, but a Japanese developer has taken another tack with the device. Using Unity, ViRD game developer @noshipu, aka Kazuya Noshiro, completely erased his face, except for his mouth and eyes, as shown in the 10-second clip below. Calling the trick "optical camouflage," Noshiro admitted that he has no clue what it can be used for. "If you want to make your face transparent, we're recruiting," he joked.

How Classical Cryptography Will Survive Quantum Computers

posted onDecember 28, 2017
by l33tdawg

Justin Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister, certainly raised the profile of quantum computing a few notches last year, when he gamely—if vaguely1—described it for a press conference. But we’ve heard a lot about quantum computers in the past few years, as Google, I.B.M., and N.A.S.A., as well as many, many universities, have all been working on, or putting money into, quantum computers for various ends.

Security News This Week: France Goes After WhatsApp For Sharing Data With Facebook

posted onDecember 28, 2017
by l33tdawg

Happy holidays from your security news friends! As a special gift, we got you this analysis of the Resistance’s tactical shortcomings in The Last Jedi. And so much more!

The US this week officially pinned this year’s devastating WannaCry ransomware attack on North Korea, after the security community had largely come to that same conclusion months ago. But in doing so, White House cybersecurity guru Tom Bossert failed to mention that the NSA shared some of that culpability; it was the intelligence agency’s EternalBlue tool, after all, that enabled WannaCry’s unprecedented spread.

Driverless cars became a reality in 2017 and hardly anyone noticed

posted onDecember 27, 2017
by l33tdawg

On November 7, Waymo announced it would begin regularly testing fully driverless cars—without a safety driver—on public roads. It was a momentous announcement. A technology that had seemed like science fiction a decade earlier became a reality. And the announcement was greeted with a yawn by much of the media and the public—if they noticed at all.