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Google reportedly tried to buy Cyanogen

posted onOctober 3, 2014
by l33tdawg

A report from The Information (subscription required) claims that Google tried to buy Cyanogen, Inc, the maker of the custom Android ROM CyanogenMod. According to the report, Cyanogen's chief executive told shareholders that Sundar Pichai, the head of Chrome and Android at Google, met with the company and "expressed interest in acquiring the firm." The report says Cyanogen Inc. declined the offer, saying that it was still growing.

Android smartphones are too far ahead for iPhones to ever catch up

posted onSeptember 12, 2014
by l33tdawg

Apple has finally conceded that big screens are better, as its new iPhones offer 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch displays. It has also finally conceded that a mobile operating system is better when it's more open, as iOS 8 supports third-party keyboards and inter-app communication. It's almost like Apple is saying that Steve Jobs was wrong while rival Android manufacturers and Google were right all along. Oh, the horror. How will Apple fanbois be able to explain this?

List of five million 'Gmail passwords' leaked

posted onSeptember 11, 2014
by l33tdawg

It might be time to change some of your passwords - again. But if you've used a Gmail password that's unique from other accounts, you might not have to worry.

A list of almost 5 million combinations of Gmail addresses and passwords was posted online on Tuesday. But the passwords seem to be old, and they don't appear to actually belong to Gmail accounts. Instead, it seems that many of the passwords were taken from websites where users used their Gmail addresses to register, according to some of the leak's victims as well as security experts.

Google and VMware team with Nvidia to bring workstation graphics to Chromebooks

posted onAugust 28, 2014
by l33tdawg

Google and VMWare have teamed up with Nvidia to bring virtual desktops and workstation grade graphics to Google Chromebooks.

The project uses the next generation of VMware's Blast and Nvidia's Grid virtual GPU technology to offer cutomers high power performance from the safety of a Google Chromebook.

VMware Blast is the firm's protocol for delivering a Windows desktop over a virtualised environment to serve up a remote desktop using HTML5, while Nvidia's Grid virtualises the GPU and data centre to provide graphical acceleration.

Cyanogen and veterans from Google, Amazon and HTC are building 'something really cool'

posted onAugust 28, 2014
by l33tdawg

Nextbit, a mobile technology company founded by former Google executives Tom Moss and Mike Chan, today announced that Scott Croyle has joined as Vice President of Design and Product. Croyle, who was most recently Senior Vice President of Design and User Experience at HTC, will also join the company’s board of directors alongside Rich Wong from Accel Partners and Rich Miner from Google Ventures.

Google Bug in Searches Spurs Talk of Hacking

posted onAugust 27, 2014
by l33tdawg

A software bug disrupted some Google searches for roughly eight hours early Tuesday, displaying multiple images of what appeared to be a car crash in Russia and sparking speculation that Google had been hacked.

The image displayed in response to many searches showed a badly mangled car near a sign that says "stop" in Russian. It wasn't clear if the image had been altered. It didn't appear on every search.

Chrome 64-bit browser finally available as a stable version

posted onAugust 27, 2014
by l33tdawg

Google today released a 64-bit stable version of its Chrome browser for Windows systems. The 64-bit support has been in testing since June, and as of Chrome version 37 it has made it to the mainstream version.

The 64-bit version offers three main advantages and one possible drawback. The browser's advantages are speed, security, and stability. Google claims that certain media and graphics workloads in particular are faster with 64-bit. It offers the example of VP9 video decoding—used for some YouTube high-definition streams—being 15 percent quicker compared to 32-bit.