LATE REGISTRATION RATES FOR #HITB2014KUL STARTS ON THE 1ST OF OCTOBER ONWARDS!

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Hands-on Technical Trainings - 13th & 14th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/#tile_schedule

Triple-Track Conference - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/conference-speakers/

 

Capture the Flag - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/capture-the-flag/

HackWEEKDAY - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/hackweekday/

CommSec Village - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/commsec-village/

Remember Righthaven? On appeal, copyright troll looks just as bad

http://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/ladyluck-300x400.jpg

Righthaven was a copyright-enforcement business dreamed up by Las Vegas attorney Steve Gibson. He managed to convince the largest newspaper in Nevada, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, to let him use its copyrights to sue more than 200 mostly small-time bloggers and demand several thousand dollars apiece from them for reposting Review-Journal articles. Righthaven struck a similar deal with the Denver Post, which led to about 50 more lawsuits.

The plan went on for over a year. It included lawsuits against a cat blogger, a mildly autistic hobby blogger, and one Ars writer; but by mid-2011, Righthaven had been absolutely pounded in court. They lost a few cases on fair use grounds. Even more profoundly, Righthaven was found not to have standing to sue at all. The contract it struck with the Review-Journal didn't transfer the whole copyright, a judge found; it merely transferred a "bare right to sue," which is not allowable under a legal precedent called Silvers v. Sony Pictures.