LATE REGISTRATION RATES FOR #HITB2014KUL STARTS ON THE 1ST OF OCTOBER ONWARDS!

REGISTER ONLINE NOW

 

Hands-on Technical Trainings - 13th & 14th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/#tile_schedule

Triple-Track Conference - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/conference-speakers/

 

Capture the Flag - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/capture-the-flag/

HackWEEKDAY - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/hackweekday/

CommSec Village - 15th & 16th October

http://conference.hitb.org/hitbsecconf2014kul/commsec-village/

Is Apple Losing Its Grip on App Store Security?

http://www.apple.com/mac/app-store/

The iOS App Store was created so that users could download and operate apps in a secure space. Theoretically, an application would not be able to execute malware on a device or purvey copyright infringing content. And all applications would pass under Apple‘s watchful eye.

However, developers who wish to bend the rules or try to defraud users of their money and sensitive information are finding new avenues by which to accomplish their goals.

The problem is that the guarantor of App Store security, Apple itself, has been lax as of late, allowing apps of dubious copyright status to slip through the cracks — especially when it comes to games. For example, a fake Pokemon Yellow app appeared on Feb. 17. This app was obviously not published by Nintendo, yet it managed to get through the approval process and, despite crash reports and a large number of one-star reviews, shot all the way up to number-one before disappearing the evening of Feb. 20.